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Greenstock's Press Articles...what people are saying about us in print and on the air!!

The Commuinty Digest  

Robert Hachey 

“It all began in Petitcodiac, NB where a man was bored one day and was not sure what to do. So he decided to have the biggest party ever…”

 What’s that? You might ask…Greenstock that is.  Mr. Stephen Murray of Petitcodiac took it upon himself to host the biggest party one could imagine in his very own backyard.  A kind-spoken fellow, Stephen gladly answers a few questions for the press under the condition we agree to mention whose of whom helped him organize such an event.  We though that was a pretty good deal!

 The first Greenstock event was held four years ago on Green Road near Stephen’ camp, hence the name.  What initially started out as a party one-day turned into a revolutionary inspiration to the town of Petitcodiac.  Stephen held the event the same weekend as the Eagles concert as an alternative for those who weren’t able to attend such an event due to high-ticket prices.  With bands playing till the sun came up and then again early the next morning.  Attendees enjoyed a place where the could pitch their tent, take advantage of concession stands, along with free overnight parking with no need to drive home all for only five dollars.  Stephen used the funds gained to replenish what was used during the three weeks prior to the event in cost of preparation.  That’s right.  Three weeks ago where five to seven hundred people stood, was nothing more than trees and a small path or two a good mile or two back in the woods.  Yes, he even built the road in that same time span.

 For those who may be disappointed as they missed last week’s performances, Stephen has full intentions on hosting future events.  In fact, there may even be something in the works for as early as this month.  “I built it and they did come.” He jokes.  Referring to his new stage that he plans on taking full advantage of, weather permitting. Stephen plans on advertising for such events on his Facebook account and through word of mouth.  This isn’t such bad idea considering a good eighty percent of attendees will more than likely are friends and neighbors. 

 All are welcome and a motto, though not official states, Leave you worries at home.  So pack your tent, your beer and your bug dope, remember now, this is in the woods. And come have some fun.  Find a friend who knows a friend who knows Stephen Murray and add his group to your Facebook account.  Things are just getting started and as they grow, Stephen has no intentions on holding back.

 Stephen would like to take advantage of such an opportunity and thank everyone who helped out during the perpetration of the event and to all those who attended the event itself.  When asked whom in particular he would like to thank, Steve knew exactly who deserved the credit.

 Paul Leger, Marsha Eagles, Pete and Charlotte Dupuis, Bernie Bourque, Terry Akerly, Albert Gallant, Ashley Garnett, Charles Murray Kurt Cummings, Darlene Cummings, Ashley Cummings, Charles Brine, Daryl Goddard for bringing the hay, Kevin A Murray Logging and Construction, Mikey Archibald, Debbie and Kevin Bannister of Woodman’s Welding.  Thanks to the bands that played, Shelbey Murray, The Leaky

Basement Band, Moe Doiron provided a light show along with all the sound equipment, Wayne Arsenault, Emile Gauvin along with everyone else who performed that night.  “Andrew and Jonnie were the last two people that stepped up and helped”, he says,  “I thank everybody that’s performed and there’s some names I’ve missed, Thank you to them and the audience too”

“…and thank you to Allison Murray, my father who owned it all that passed it on to me”

 “Any final words?” I asked.  “Yeah” he said.  “Thanks”

                          June 2012

Some articles about the Greenstock concerts. Also a huge thank-you to Monctons 

K94.5, and C103 radio stations. Its everyone like you guys that help. 

 

This article is from the Saturday June.23 2012 TimesTranscript

This one is from Snap Moncton by Terry Parker Host of MAX Mornings.

 

                    Sunday Aug. 21 2011

Hello Greenstockians!!

 Check out this ad on the herenb.com website.
Just click the link and it should take you right to it.

http://herenb.canadaeast.com/music/article/1432642

Moncton Times and Transcript  Published Tuesday June 2nd, 2009

Sometimes you meet the nicest people by accident

Alan Cochrane

One of the great things about being a writer is that you never know where the next assignment will take you and what kind of interesting people you might meet by accident.

Last week, I made a quick trip out to Salisbury to interview and photograph singer Don Coleman and young musician Shelby Murray for a story about last Sunday night's charity concert to benefit the Friends of The Moncton Hospital Foundation. I found them sitting at an old piano laughing and giggling about the upcoming show and talking about their shared love for music.

"I love to play the blues and the old stuff," says Shelby, who at the tender age of 18 is really starting to develop a natural ability to transfer her bubbly personality into the music she plays.

Shelby has been blind since birth and started banging on the piano at the age of two. Over the years she has taught herself many songs and also learned to play guitar, accordion, and harmonica, and says she's starting to work on playing the bagpipes.

She talked about how she met the late great Canadian guitar legend Jeff Healey and became pen pals. They exchanged e-mails on a regular basis, talking about such strange subjects as how blind people can cut their own toenails. As we spoke, Shelby's mom Caroline came up with a tattered newspaper clipping from the Times & Transcript of June 15, 1999, which talked about how she was working with Terry Kelly and other blind musicians.

Her mom likes to tell the story of how she tried to be politically correct when explaining Shelby's situation and whether to describe it as blind or visually impaired, to which Shelby calls out "I'm blind as a bat, whatever that means!"

After taking the picture, I was about to leave when Shelby handed me a copy of her CD, called First Takes. It's a collection of songs performed by Shelby with help from Allison Inch and Mike Stevens. She says it's a rough cut, recorded off the floor at Primetime Studios in Sussex without any edits or overdubbing. But the simplicity of this album is what gives it charm and makes you feel you're right in the room with Shelby as she rattles off fun old standards like Chattanooga Choo Choo, In The Mood and Move It On Over.

Even though it's an instrumental album, you can hear her laughing, whooping and singing along on some of the tracks. I popped the CD into the player for the drive back to Moncton and was bopping along with it all the way back to the office. It's simply one of the most fun CDs I've ever heard because you can tell she is having lots of fun while playing and the piano sound on most of the tracks has that old-time, tacks on the hammers, saloon sound.

But there's a couple of slow tracks that could almost bring tears to your eyes because they are played with real heart and emotion. Somehow, Shelby really captures her feelings and emotions in her playing, and isn't that what playing music is all about?

Shelby makes appearances once in a while and will graduate from JMA Armstrong High this year. I wish her the best and hope she keeps on learning new songs and turning them around in her own way.

She is scheduled to perform at the upcoming Greenstock outdoor show on June 20 in Petitcodiac. Other bands scheduled are Neon Highway, the Divorcees and Loaded Dice. For more information on that show, visit the website at www.greenstockentertainment.com.

Meeting Shelby was just another example of how Metro Moncton's music scene follows the "six degrees of separation" theory.

Shelby was singing with Don Coleman, who also performs with a band called Loaded Dice, which can be found performing their own versions of classic rock tunes at various venues around the city. A few of the guys in that band can also be found playing for Old School, another hard-rockin' cover band. Old School is one of those unsung hero bands that can be counted on to deliver some good old classic rock cover songs at benefit shows, outdoor concerts and as an opening act for such touring bands as April Wine.

But now, Old School is getting ready to follow in the footsteps of other Metro bands by releasing a new CD of original material. The singer is another old friend of mine, Jon Guitard . Johnny and I go way back to the old days in Lewisville (we used to call him Johnny Geetar) and he's been singing in bands for many years, probably most notably sharing vocal duties with Scotty Horsman in the Boogie Bros.

His brother, Marc, made a name for himself as the "Singing Chef" around Moncton. I used to get my hair cut by their father, Vic Guitard, who had a barber shop in his basement. We used to jokingly call him "Victor Banjo."

It seems like every time I bump into him at the hockey rinks or music stores, he's got an update about the new album. The band has been working at this for months and finally ready to hold an album release party later this month.

The rest of the band includes some hard-workin' guys (Steve Stewart, Dave LeBlanc, Craig O'Neill and Frank Hache) who wouldn't dare give up their day jobs as coffee barons and music store gurus to devote their lives to hittin' the road and making a living playing music.

Instead, they take the meagre payments for local gigs and sock it away into gear and studio time so they can give even more back to the community.

Silliness aside, or maybe it's just getting started, Old School's album appears to be called "The Detention Years," and it further appears that at least one well-known Metro radio personality jumped into the album cover photo in the guise of a naughty high school girl, complete with blonde ponytail and knotted-up blouse. I'll need a closer look at the photo to be certain and hopefully someone will slip me an advance copy before the big album release party at the Rockin' Rodeo on June 20.

Have fun with it guys!

* City Views appears daily, written by various members of our staff. Alan Cochrane is an editor-at-large and his column appears each Tuesday. He can be reached by e-mail at cochrana@timestranscript.com

Moncton Times and Transcript    Published  May 2nd, 2009

Greenstock Concert blooms June 20

First artists take stage in Petitcodiac at 1 p.m.

BY YVON GAUVIN

PETITCODIAC - Some rollicking good music is on tap June 20 when organizers of the 2009 Greenstock Concert launch a program headlined by Neon Highway and the Divorcees.

 A number of local artists will be playing throughout the day at the concert site in Petitcodiac including talented Shelby Murray of Salisbury.

Greenstock Concert promoter Stephen Murray created the venue in 2004 with the help of family and friends, transforming a camp into an open concert scene.

The second gathering occurred last summer during the Eagles concert in Moncton for those who couldn't get tickets to the Eagles, Murray explained.

Several hundred people turned out and had a great time, he said.

Murray, who also performs in the show, credits family and friends for making it all happen, from a makeshift stage trucked to the site to a large permanent platform and open areas for tenting and parking along with food concessions and washrooms.

Entrance fee is $15 with the first artist taking the stage at 1 p.m.

Artists include Emile Gauvin, Ivan Daigle, Bury The Anguish, Defiance and Broken Coast Showcase featuring Nayles, Clutch, The North Face, AWOL, DJ Adam Oates and DJ Matty J.

The evening program will begin with Embrefire*, then The Grays, Shelby Murray and Zane Gray.

Stephen Murray and The Wonderlandband take the stage at 8:30 p.m. followed by Neon Highway, the Divorcees and at 12:30 a.m., Don Coleman and Loaded Dice.

Two buses will transport patrons from Moncton and back for those who don't want to drive down.

The buses will depart Moncton at 10 a.m. in front of the Canadian Tire outlet on Mountain Road.

As an added attraction, promoters are inviting budding artists to bring their spray cans and other paints to display their artistic prowess on a fence separating the parking lot from the concert site.

There's a $200 top prize. Greenstock Entertainment will also unveil its new flag at the concert.

Travellers using the Trans-Canada Highway from Moncton need to exit the off-ramp near the Irving service station in Petitcodiac and turn left toward Elgin and travel a short distance before reaching the Ranch Road.

The site is less than three kilometres (about a mile) along the Ranch Road.

 *corrected

Correction for Times and Transcript article

The article was written before the Greenstock Staff had the chance to update our playlists and website info, and because of this some of the info is not correct or up to date so we would like to clarify it for everyone. Our sincerest apologies to one of the artists who was excluded, Michelle Thibodeau who will take the stage in the afternoon. We would also like to apologize to the band who will be opening the evening performances...it is not Twelve as stated in the article, the band that is playing is called Embrefire (so sorry for the confusion guys....please forgive us) The Greenstock staff apologizes for any inconvenience or confusion this may have caused our performers and patrons.

Moncton Times & Transcript   Published Thursday May 21st, 2009

Country, rock, Greenstock and charity concerts   

 With the good weather finally here, there are many people planning for outdoor fun. One of them is Stephen Murray, who is planning a big party in Petitcodiac on June 20.

Greenstock 2009 will be a day-long outdoor concert with a growing list of musical performers. The event took root a few years ago.

"In 2004, friends of mine, Duane Rice and Mark Arsenault, went back to my camp and we put some bricks in the ground, set up some stones and by four we had a stage," Murray said.

They expected about 30 people and had about 300 show up for the show.

A couple of years later, Murray's wife passed away and he is quite frank about the downward spiral he went into, including drug problems.

"I don't mind flogging my mistakes, if what I tell may help others."

His friends tried to help him out of his personal slide into troubled times by joining with him to build a concert stage. One friend died of cancer before it was finished, but before he passed away he told Murray not to quit. A brother who works in construction came with a bull-dozer to help.

The event is meant to be a relaxed affair compared to other bigger-name events. Murray said the posters for last summer's event joked that no one would be frisked-unless they were a good-looking woman. He wasn't sure how people would take it, but said he had a few demands to be searched. The 2008 show had an elaborate light show, with about 700 fans showing up.

"Our security are ex-bouncers. If they see someone having a problem, they bring them to me and I buy them a hamburger," Murray said.

He said he doesn't want people treated like criminals and is taking the tension out of going to a concert .

Murray also doesn't want to see people gouged, so they can bring their own food. He is also having a well dug for a water supply. There will be a wishing well people can throw money into to help defray the cost.

The Greenstock concert site this June will be on Ranch Road in Petitcodiac and Murray said the site can hold several thousand people on its 237 acres.

The talented line-up will include Ivan Daigle and Beer Money, Loaded Dice, Rik Reese and Neon Highway, Murray's niece Shelby Murray and The Divorcees, with more acts being added.

There will be buses running to the site from Moncton and Murray is trying to make arrangements for buses to run from Sussex.

The cost of the bus package will include the ride, the show, a campsite, $10 of canteen coupons, door prizes and a ticket on a motorcycle. For more information, see www.greenstockentertainment.com.

Country, bagpipes and music of all stripes...

A great selection of musicians is gathering for a musical benefit for the Friends of The Moncton Hospital Foundation. The Small Band-Aid Charity Concert will take place Sunday May 31 at the Riverview Arts Centre. Appearing will be rock and blues performer Don Coleman with special guest pianist Shelby Murray; blues belter Theresa Malenfant; New Brunswick Country Music Hall of Fame bluegrass musician Eddy Poirier, with Rose Poirier and Fern Maillet; musical duo Isaac and Blewatt, 2007 winner of acoustic group of the year at the Maple Blues Awards; Nashville country recording artist Shirley Albert; country recording artist Todd Geldart; La Musica Dolce, made up of members of the New Brunswick Youth Orchestra and bagpiper Kevin MacLeod. Showtime is 7 p.m. and tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Order tickets online at the Riverview Arts Centre website (www.riverviewartscentre.ca) or purchase them at Frank's Music in Moncton; Jean Coutu in Riverview; Sobeys in Riverview; Ford's Apothecary in Moncton; the Albert County Wellness Centre; both Irving locations in Hillsborough or the Friends of the Moncton Hospital Foundation Office in the Moncton Hospital.

* NB Country is a regular This Week feature about New Brunswick country music and performers. If you have an idea for a future NB Country column, contact Tony McGarrigle at kingscountycountry@yahoo.com. 

Moncton Times and Transcript  Published Tuesday June 2nd, 2009

Sometimes you meet the nicest people by accident

Alan Cochrane

One of the great things about being a writer is that you never know where the next assignment will take you and what kind of interesting people you might meet by accident.

Last week, I made a quick trip out to Salisbury to interview and photograph singer Don Coleman and young musician Shelby Murray for a story about last Sunday night's charity concert to benefit the Friends of The Moncton Hospital Foundation. I found them sitting at an old piano laughing and giggling about the upcoming show and talking about their shared love for music.

"I love to play the blues and the old stuff," says Shelby, who at the tender age of 18 is really starting to develop a natural ability to transfer her bubbly personality into the music she plays.

Shelby has been blind since birth and started banging on the piano at the age of two. Over the years she has taught herself many songs and also learned to play guitar, accordion, and harmonica, and says she's starting to work on playing the bagpipes.

She talked about how she met the late great Canadian guitar legend Jeff Healey and became pen pals. They exchanged e-mails on a regular basis, talking about such strange subjects as how blind people can cut their own toenails. As we spoke, Shelby's mom Caroline came up with a tattered newspaper clipping from the Times & Transcript of June 15, 1999, which talked about how she was working with Terry Kelly and other blind musicians.

Her mom likes to tell the story of how she tried to be politically correct when explaining Shelby's situation and whether to describe it as blind or visually impaired, to which Shelby calls out "I'm blind as a bat, whatever that means!"

After taking the picture, I was about to leave when Shelby handed me a copy of her CD, called First Takes. It's a collection of songs performed by Shelby with help from Allison Inch and Mike Stevens. She says it's a rough cut, recorded off the floor at Primetime Studios in Sussex without any edits or overdubbing. But the simplicity of this album is what gives it charm and makes you feel you're right in the room with Shelby as she rattles off fun old standards like Chattanooga Choo Choo, In The Mood and Move It On Over.

Even though it's an instrumental album, you can hear her laughing, whooping and singing along on some of the tracks. I popped the CD into the player for the drive back to Moncton and was bopping along with it all the way back to the office. It's simply one of the most fun CDs I've ever heard because you can tell she is having lots of fun while playing and the piano sound on most of the tracks has that old-time, tacks on the hammers, saloon sound.

But there's a couple of slow tracks that could almost bring tears to your eyes because they are played with real heart and emotion. Somehow, Shelby really captures her feelings and emotions in her playing, and isn't that what playing music is all about?

Shelby makes appearances once in a while and will graduate from JMA Armstrong High this year. I wish her the best and hope she keeps on learning new songs and turning them around in her own way.

She is scheduled to perform at the upcoming Greenstock outdoor show on June 20 in Petitcodiac. Other bands scheduled are Neon Highway, the Divorcees and Loaded Dice. For more information on that show, visit the website at www.greenstockentertainment.com.

Meeting Shelby was just another example of how Metro Moncton's music scene follows the "six degrees of separation" theory.

Shelby was singing with Don Coleman, who also performs with a band called Loaded Dice, which can be found performing their own versions of classic rock tunes at various venues around the city. A few of the guys in that band can also be found playing for Old School, another hard-rockin' cover band. Old School is one of those unsung hero bands that can be counted on to deliver some good old classic rock cover songs at benefit shows, outdoor concerts and as an opening act for such touring bands as April Wine.

But now, Old School is getting ready to follow in the footsteps of other Metro bands by releasing a new CD of original material. The singer is another old friend of mine, Jon Guitard . Johnny and I go way back to the old days in Lewisville (we used to call him Johnny Geetar) and he's been singing in bands for many years, probably most notably sharing vocal duties with Scotty Horsman in the Boogie Bros.

His brother, Marc, made a name for himself as the "Singing Chef" around Moncton. I used to get my hair cut by their father, Vic Guitard, who had a barber shop in his basement. We used to jokingly call him "Victor Banjo."

It seems like every time I bump into him at the hockey rinks or music stores, he's got an update about the new album. The band has been working at this for months and finally ready to hold an album release party later this month.

The rest of the band includes some hard-workin' guys (Steve Stewart, Dave LeBlanc, Craig O'Neill and Frank Hache) who wouldn't dare give up their day jobs as coffee barons and music store gurus to devote their lives to hittin' the road and making a living playing music.

Instead, they take the meagre payments for local gigs and sock it away into gear and studio time so they can give even more back to the community.

Silliness aside, or maybe it's just getting started, Old School's album appears to be called "The Detention Years," and it further appears that at least one well-known Metro radio personality jumped into the album cover photo in the guise of a naughty high school girl, complete with blonde ponytail and knotted-up blouse. I'll need a closer look at the photo to be certain and hopefully someone will slip me an advance copy before the big album release party at the Rockin' Rodeo on June 20.

Have fun with it guys!

* City Views appears daily, written by various members of our staff. Alan Cochrane is an editor-at-large and his column appears each Tuesday. He can be reached by e-mail at cochrana@timestranscript.com